Alcohol and Drugs

Drinking too much alcohol and using drugs can increase the risk of developing serious health problems such as liver disease, cancers, depression, anxiety, heart disease, high blood pressure and obesity. 

  • Know your limits
  • Men should drink no more than 21 units of alcohol per week (and no more than four units in any one day)
  • Women should drink no more than 14 units of alcohol per week (and no more than three units in any one day)
  • Try to have at least 3 alcohol-free nights per week
  • Pregnant women: Alcohol and drugs  can damage a developing baby. Advice from the Department of Health is that pregnant women and women trying to become pregnant should not take illegal (non-prescription) drugs or drink at all.  If you do chose to drink when you are pregnant then limit it to one or two units, once or twice a week and never get drunk
  • Although there is some evidence to suggest that drinking one to two units of alcohol per day can protect against the risk of coronary heart disease in men over 40 and women after the menopause, there is no clear evidence that any alcohol gives any added health protection generally
  • Using alcohol or drugs regularly is a step away from addiction

We support a number of alcohol and drugs misuse initiatives in the Western Trust area.

Drugs and Alcohol Training Programme provides training opportunities to individuals living and working in the Western Trust area, representing community/voluntary, health, social care, criminal justice and youth organisations.
All courses are delivered free of charge to individuals living and working in the WHSSB area and are delivered to groups representing community/voluntary, health, social care, criminal justice and youth organisations.

  • Drugs and Alcohol Intervention Training (6 week programme which includes mentor support for participants)
  • Alcohol in Pregnancy
  • Alcohol, Drugs & the Looked after Child
  • You, Your Client and Blood Borne Viruses.
  • Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
  • Hidden Harm Training
  • Hidden harm for early years workers.
  • Reflective practice and skill building throughout.
  • Substance use and mental health
  • Motivational Interviewing
  • New Drugs in Our Community; What We Need to Know?
  • Joint Service Agreement Training
  • Substance Misuse and the Older Person

 

Find out more about the Alcohol and Drug Service in the Northern Sector

Find out more about the Addiction Treatment Unit.

    

For further information please contact Joyce Thompson, Health Improvement Officer.